January/February 2015 - St. Sophia Greek Orthodox Church

ST. SOPHIA GREEK ORTHODOX CHURCH
440 WHITEHALL ROAD
ALBANY, N.Y. 12208
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REV. FATHER PATRIC LEGATO
SAINT BASIL THE GREAT | JANUARY 1
ST. HARALAMBOS | FEBRUARY 10
Apolytikion. First Tone. Your sound has gone forth
into all the earth, which has receivd your word.
Thereby you have divinely taught the Faith; you
have made manifest the nature of all things that be;
you have adorned the ways of humankind. O
namesake of the royal priesthood, our righteous
Father Basil, intercede with Christ God that our
souls be saved.
Apolytikion. Fourth Tone. You are an unshaken
pillar of the Church of Christ our God, an everresplendent lamp., O Haralambos most wise, which
shines throughout the earth; in the contest of
martyrdom you have shined on the whole world, and
you have dispelled the moonless night of the idols.
Now boldly intercede with Christ that we may all be
saved.
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JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2015
VOLUME: XX
[T he T estament is published bi-monthly]
Issue: 1
ST. SOPHIA GREEK ORTHODOX CHURCH
Tel: (518) 489-4442
440 Whitehall Road, Albany, N.Y. 12208
Fax: (518) 489-0374
St. Sophia’s E-Mail: [email protected] or Helen Sokaris: [email protected]
St Sophia’s Internet Website: STSOPHIA.NET
Greek School Internet Website: STSOPHIAGREEKSCHOOL.ORG
Archdiocese Internet Website: WWW.GOARCH.ORG
Rev. Fr. Patric Legato. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pastor
Constantine Yavis. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Deacon
TBA. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Parish Council President
Margaret Danes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Secretary
Evan Anton. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Neokoros
George Lenares. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chanter
Theodora Mokhiber. . . Philoptochos President
Alfredo Ramos. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Plant Manager
PARISH C O UN C IL
Listed below are the members of the 2015 Parish Council.
Officers will be elected following ratification by the
Archdiocese and swearing in of the new Parish Council.
Committee selections will follow by the elected President.
Angelo Bousbouras
Gregory Docous
Stefan Kalogridis
Constantine Karlaftis
George Marinopoulos
Peter Melas
Theodore Moisides
Steven Moutopoulos
Gregory Sokaris
Demetra Xythalis Vann
Dimitri Yavis
Peter Ziamandanis
The committees below will be updated and adjusted when
the President is elected and makes his/her selection.
News and articles from parishioners are welcome. Please submit by the 10th of each month.
Acolytes. . . . . James Diamantopoulos | Head Altar Boy Alex Melas | Epistle Reading George Marinopoulos/Spiro Sokaris
Advertising & Marketing.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chair Maria Neal
Archives/Library. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Director Dr. Christopher Kendris and Borislav Dinkov, Associate Director
Bible Study. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Facilitator Rev. Father Patric Legato
Buildings, Grounds & Beautification. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chair Peter Ziamandanis
Catering/Hall Rental . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Parish Council
Choir and Junior Choir. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Director Harry Ermides
Coffee Hour. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Parish Council and Philoptochos
Community Outreach. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maria Neal, Margaret Danes & Parish Council
Dance Group.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Director Diane Yavis Cohen
Energy Initiative.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Alex Nichols
Graceland Cemetery. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chair Charles Sarris
Greek Festival 2015. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Parish Council
Greek Festival Catering and Purchasing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Parish Council
Hellenic Education. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chair Anthony Rodolakis
eGreek School (Adult & Afternoon Program).. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Director/Teacher Kiki Maglaras
eGreek School (Afternoon Program). . . . . . . . . . . . Teachers Kiki Maglaras, Eleni Efstathiadis, and Angeliki Pontisakos
Investments. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Gregory A. Sokaris, Ted Pontisakos, Dean Karlaftis and Anthony Rodolakis
Long Term Planning.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Peter Melas, Alex Nichols, George Marinopoulos
Makaria. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Co-Chairs Dora Mokhiber and Elaine Sokaris
Personnel Committee. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Anthony Rodolakis and Peter Melas
Religious Education. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Director, Rev. Dr. Dennis Nagi
Scholarship. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Co-Chairs Frosine Stolis and Dean Karlaftis
Senior Citizens.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chair James Stolis
Special Events/Fund Raising. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chair Theodora Mokhiber
Stewardship Program. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chair Bessie Malamas and George Marinopoulos
Youth Committee. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chair Rev. Fr. Patric Legato
eAthletic Program. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Advisor Gregory Docous
eGOYA. . . . Advisors Mary Googas, Lea Marinopoulos, Maria Sokaris, & Maria Ziamandanis | President Spiro Sokaris
eJOY.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Advisors Christina Anagnostopoulos, Maria Cholakis, Christina Lasher, and Lenore Tsamis
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AHEPA. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . President Nick Panayotou
Apartments | Whitehall Management. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . President Peter Melas
Apartments | St. Sophia & Holy Wisdom. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . President John C. Googas
Auditing (2015 & 2016). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . George Pappis, Michael Koutsourades, and Nancy Athanassiadis
Daughters of Penelope.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . President Lauren Mouzakes Viola
Election Committee. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chair Theodore Kondoprias
Maids of Athena. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . President Alex McCullough
Sons of Pericles. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . President Michael Ziamandanis
EDITORIAL S TAFF
Rev. Fr. Patric Legato, Editor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Helen Sokaris, Co-Editor
INSIGHTS
Father Pat
room watching segment 235 of her
soap opera saga. They just sat
wondering what really had
transpired. The anticipation was so
high. It s eemed to take forever to
arrive, and then like a flash of
lightening, it was over. So they
watched the multi-granulated
snowflakes fall from the cloud-filled
sky wondering, pondering their next
move and drifted off to sleep.
Harry and his sister Josephine were
sitting on the couch looking out of
the great bay window facing the
street. The Christmas holiday had
passed and all their gifts were
scattered about the room. All that
remained under the decorated
evergreen tree were the remnants of
carefully packaged toys, clothing,
and nicknacks they had received for
the festive holiday. Bits and pieces
of torn paper, rumpled bows and
fallen ornaments littered the carpet.
It was reminiscent of a fall hurricane
besieging the area just a few years
earlier which had scattered birds in
flight and strewn branches and trash
all over the yard. Snow had fallen
overnight and was continuing even
as they gazed outside. School was
out for this Christmas break and
they both yearned to be outside
frolicking, sledding, building a snow
man, or even tos sing snowballs at
each other. The weather, however,
was not cooperating. Jus t a few
days earlier, the house was festively
adorned and filled to overcapacity
with family members celebrating the
joyous holiday. They ate, drank,
s ang, played and thoroughly
exhausted themselves Christmas
Day and the following day, and the
day after that. The house was now
empty. All the company had
departed to return to their daily
routines. Even their parents had left.
They went off to work and though
yiayia was home to watch over the
two of them, she was in the sitting
Suddenly they were awakened by a
tumultuous commotion. Yiayia had
found them asleep and noticed the
logs burning in the fireplace had
burnt out. Not even the cinders at
the base of the grating were red.
The fire was ice cold. Quickly their
grandmother began to shout in
Greek some unintelligible word a
word neither was familiar with that
sounded like kali kamikaze? All they
could think of was that yiayia was
reliving the Second World War.
They had never heard of a “good”
kamikaze. Still she shouted aloud
and shouted instructions to each of
the children to re-stoke the fireplace
as fast as possible and get the fire
blazing before these kali kamikaze’s
could come into the house. “They
will come down the chimney and
take you away,” s he cried out in
Greek. “Quick, hurry. Light the fire.”
Harry and Josephine scurried
around, with each gathering sticks to
burn, newspapers to assist the
flames, and look for matches. Oh
Oh! Mom and dad hid the matches,
so that, as prudent parents, the kids
could not play with fire, literally.
Yiayia was in a tizzy. She looked like
she would faint and gathered the
children close to her squeezing,
hugging and shielding them from the
now gone cold fire in the fireplace.
She remained vigilant for hours
singing hymns from church and
praying. All the while the children
thought this is what is meant by a
melt down. “Παράκαλώ! Να µή τα
πάρης τα
repeating!
παιδιά,”
she
kept
The children knew not what to think.
Yes sir, yiayia has los t it, they
mused as they became entwined in
her protective grasp. The c hildren
wondered what really was going on
with their grandmother. Harry
thought about the cell phone
mommy had left him, but he was
having such a good time this week,
the battery had died. Now he was in
this death grip, along with his sister
trying to figure out a way to call
anyone to...when he remembered
the lighter for the grill.
Harry quickly shouted that the lighter
for the grill was outside at the fire pit
and he could go outside and get it if
y iay ia would let him. “It is snowing
hard,” she said, but Harry assured
her he could get it and they could
start the fire. Braving the elements,
he ran from the house, retrieved the
lighter and returned to the living
room. Covered in snow, he began to
flick and then shake the Bic lighter,
but it would not catch. Finally it
sparked, and lit. He attacked the
news paper and dry wood and the
flames grew until they were licking
the flue. Yiayia released her grip and
gave a comforting sigh. She smiled
at Josephine and pinched Harry’s
cheeks. “We are all saved,” she
joyously proclaimed and returned to
watch segment 236 of her soap
opera.
All Harry and Josephine could do
was s heepishly grin. “W hat
happened, “Josephine questioned?
“Darn if I know,” Harry replied.
“Wow, that was amazing! I can’t wait
to tell mommy. Yiayia has lost it,”
Josephine proclaimed. “Harry, you
better keep an eye on the fire. There
is no telling what yiayia will do if it
goes out again,” Josephine retorted.
And so they both kept an eye or two
on the fireplace and when the wood
burned down added another to the
fire.
Finally, their parents returned from
work. Harry and his sister did not
exchange the customary greeting
with their parents, didn’t talk about
the snowstorm, or even mention
their boredom. That had all ended
when yiayia re-visited World War II.
Instead they told their parents about
the fire dying out and yiayia’s bizarre
behavior. Curiously, their parents did
not call 911 for the emergency
medical team to come and evaluate
yiayia, but burst out laughing. They
laughed so hard that their father fell
down and their mother started
crying. “She said what,” their mother
chuckled? “It was s omething about
‘kali kamikaze’s,” Harry blurted out!
Their parents again burst out in
laughter and after seeing the
confused look in the fac es of their
children began to relate the story of
the Kallikantzaroi. They were mythic
creatures of the night who would
stay under ground sawing the World
tree which held up the earth. With
the coming of Christmas, the Birth of
Jesus, the tree would be restored
and these kallikantzaroi would come
to the surface. These goblins, these
mischievous imps would then try to
bedevil the people living on the
surfac e and play tricks on them.
They were sneaky and could get into
any house unless the house was
protected. They are afraid of fire,
light, and holy water. They do not
like garlic, or incense, cannot count
to three, and hide in dark corners
when they see the cross. They
mostly enter a person’s house
through the chimney, and that is why
yiayia wanted to keep the fire going.
Once they enter into a house, they
overturn furniture, eat the food, spoil
the water, and just reek havoc. It is
best to keep them out and between
December 25 and January 5 they
are outside looking to get into the
house.
Josephine was inquisitive and asked
why they leave on January 6? Her
parents explained that the
Theophany takes place and all the
waters are blessed, and so they
leave the earth and return underground. “That is why we have our
house bles sed every year by the
priest,” he replied. “Father Basili
sprinkles holy water throughout the
house, and especially on the fireplace to ward off these evil beings,”
their mother added. “Although it is
only a fable, Greek fokelore, it points
out just how important the Holy days
and Theophany really are for all of
us, “ the father added. “So that is
why yiayia became so concerned,”
Josephine said. “Well,” Harry said, “I
won’t let that fire go out next year,
and when I see Father Basili on
Sunday in the altar, I will remind him
that we will all be waiting for him,
and especially yiayia, to come and
bless our house.”
Then Josephine asked, “What about
people without chimneys? What
happens to them?” “Why that’s a
whole other story,” her mother
replied. “Come on. Let’s eat and ask
yiayia about the kallikantzaroi. I bet
she has some great stories” Happy
New Year!
PARISH COUNCIL
Peter Melas
Happy New Year!. . . . . Καλή Χρονιά!
It is hard to believe that another year has gone
by. I hope everyone enjoyed their Christmas
Holiday and was able to spend time with family
and friends. With the holidays behind us it is
now time to focus and look ahead to what
2015 might bring. Before we look ahead, I
would like to say how much I enjoyed serving
as President of the Community and want to
thank every member of the Parish Council for
their hard work. The Council had the best
interests of the Community in mind at all times
and I truly enjoyed working with each and
every one of them.
During 2014 our community experienced many
achievements, we saw membership increase,
we continued to see our youth involved in the
Church and we initiated our involvement in the
Family Promise.
In addition, the Church had several large
capital expenditures, including the repair of the
gymnasium wall and paving of the Church
parking lot.
Unfortunately, 2014 also brought sadness to
our Community with the passing of several
members of the St. Sophia Family. May their
memory be eternal.
Looking ahead to 2015, I want to welcome the
new members of our Parish Council and look
forward to January 4th, when Fr. Pat will swear
in the new Council along with our annual
tradition of cutting the Vasilopita. On January
6th our St. Sophia will celebrate Epiphany and
at the end of the month on the 25th the Greek
School will present the Three Hierarchs
Celebration.
9/11 is still fresh in our minds and cannot be
forgotten. Philoptochos is sponsoring a fund
raiser on January 17th for the construction of
the St. Nicholas National Shrine at Ground
Zero. This is a small way that we can honor
those lost on that infamous day. We hope to
see many of our parishioners and friends
attend. In the meantime during the coffee
fellowship on Sundays we will be playing a
video of what St. Nicholas will look like.
In February we will begin our Lenten Period
with our Cheesefare Sunday on February 22nd.
To all Parishioners:
I want to say thank you to all of the parishioners who
have switched their electric meters to Viridian Energy!
For those who don’t know yet what that means, let me
explain. About a year ago or so, St Sophia joined a
program that Viridian Energy has for not-for-profits.
This program lets St Sophia get a residual income ($2 or
more every month) from anyone, parishioner or not, that
switches their electric supply company (ESCO) to
Viridian Energy (www.viridian.com/stsophia). To date,
St. Sophia has earned over $3000 from having you all
involved. This has been done with less than 10% of our
community. Can you imagine if we had everyone in the
community on board? We are always looking to find
money to support our Church, and as we search for
additional income other than our Festival and other
fundraisers that always are asking the public to c ome
and support us, with this Residual Fundraising Program
(RFP), we raise money for our church, while at the same
time, allowing people to save mone y on their bills
AND help the environment at the same time. It costs
them NOTHING!!!!! For those that are interested in
obtaining Solar panels with $0 out of pocket, please
contact me, or go to www.viridian.com/stsophia and
check the box for a solar consultation. This program
significantly helps the Church by added incentive
bonuses it receives just for people asking for a no-
obligation proposal for their own home. Viridian is also
offering a 3 year fixed electric rate called 3DOM fixed.
Prices will be rising over the next three years
significantly and this is a chance to have price certainty
during this volatile energy market…REMEMBER
LAST WINTER??
I thought I would also mention that while we want
parishioners and their friends and family to switch their
meters over to Viridian through us, there is also a
business opportunity associated with this program and
Viridian itself, that further helps our Church to grow it
residual income to unlimited amounts. We already have
5 parishioners involved, and as we grow an organization
under the Church, the Church benefits even more.
Again we thank you for the support and helping
spreading the word about this. The bigger this becomes,
the less we have to rely on the backbreaking work all of
the community participates in. Feel free to call me at
518-461-8963 if you have any questions, concerns or
are interested in an opportunity to have a part time
income source.
Alex Nichols
PHILOPTOCHOS
Friends of the Poor
Theodora Mokhiber, President
On behalf of the entire Philoptochos, I s end you our
warmest greetings for a Happy New Year!
2014 was a very busy year for our Ladies Philoptochos
Society. Special thanks to the ladies that participated in
the many events this past year.
1. The Antique Doll Show net profit was $1,001.19.
2. Garage Sale took in a net profit of $2,775.17.
Ladies, your support is greatly appreciated!
The bag lunches for the Homeless Program is continuing throughout 2015. Thank you to Helen Sokaris, Maria
Blinkhorn, Norma Damascos, Mary Hormovitis, Helen
Trigonis, Jan Gallas, Irene Mafilios and Polly
Chakmakas for their donations. Your generous monetary
help provides 50 bag lunches for those in need, locally.
Membership reminders will be sent to members shortly.
Your dues cover National and District commitments and
allow us to support local charities.
3. Breast Cancer Walk donations.
4, Day of Simple Giving – Thank you to the Sons of
Pericles, Maids of Athena and the Philoptochos
ladies for their help in making this another successful
event. It was very heartwarming to s ee everyone
work together.
5. Philoptochos once again sponsored Christmas at
Sea (Albany Maritime Ministry).
6. Many thanks to Kathy Nucci for arranging our
Christmas Party which included the Daughters of
Penelope and the Schenectady and Troy
Philoptochos chapters.
7. Thank you to Shalyn Docous for chairing the Craft
Fair which had a net profit of $815.00.
Our sincere gratitude goes out to Tina Marathakis for her
hospital vis its and to Anne Hadjioannou for visiting
nursing homes and shut-ins.
Thank you to Kathryn Sokaris and her committee for
baking the vasilopita.
REMINDER: St. Nicholas Luncheon on January 17th.
Please make every effort to attend this event. It is for a
worthy cause. Please see the flyer in this issue.
We are always look ing for new ideas for programs as
well as fun ideas for fund raisers. Thanks again for all of
your hard work and dedication. I wish you all a very
Happy Valentine’s Day!
LADIES PHILOPTOCHOS SOCIETY
JANUARY AND FEBRUARY 2015 CALENDAR
MEETINGS / 2nd Tuesday of Month – Refreshments/Meeting at 6:15 PM | Program at 7:00 PM
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Saturday
Tri-City Philoptochos & Daughters of Penelope Christmas Party
Shaker Ridge Country Club | Kathy Nucci & Cookie Patelos, Chairs
04
Sunday
Vasiloptia Cutting in Church
Collection Tray for St. Basil’s Academy
13
Tuesday
GENERAL MEETING
Cutting of Vasilopita | Vickie Lembesis, Chair
10
Tuesday
GENERAL MEETING | Louise Mabin, Chair
23
Monday
Lent Begins
28
Saturday
Saturday of Souls Lenten Luncheon | Vickie Lembesis, Chair
Proceeds to benefit Holy Cross/Hellenic College
The 28th Annual
Lenten Luncheon
February 28, 2015
sponsored by
The Philoptochos Society
of
St. Sophia Greek Orthodox Church
The 28 th Annual Lenten Luncheon will be held
on Saturday, February 28, 2015 following the Divine Liturgy
[3rd Saturday of Souls / '’ [email protected]$$"[email protected]<]
LUNCHEON
12:00 P.M.
There is no admission charge.
However, an offering tray will be passed.
Reservations are requested by calling
Vickie Lembesis, Chair (438-5316)
Please join us for this expression of
Christian fellowship as we enter the Lenten Season
SAINT M AXIMOS (KAFSOKALYVITIS)
January 13
The incredible saga of
the monasteries of
Mount Athos is the
summation of the life’s
work of some of the
most noble spirits of
Christianity. Among the
many holy men of
Mount Athos whose
affinity to God has led
to their sainthood, and
perhaps the mos t
no t e w o r t h y
and
c ertainly the mos t
unique, was Max imos,
a
man
wh o s e
asceticism and peculiar lifestyle set him apart from his
peers. A confirmed non-conformist, Max imos
epitomized the rugged individualism of the monks
whose behavior was generally considered eccentric by
the outside world. Sensual society that deemed
monasticism irregular at best would have undoubtedly
seen Maximos as hopelessly deranged. And yet, if it
had seen his pure spirit it would have knelt before him.
Admitted to the sacred confines of Mount Athos at the
age of seventeen, Maximos, over a span of nearly
eighty years , evinced a piety and wisdom that
endeared him to countless pilgrims seeking his
counsel and blessing. He never ceased to inspire
those about him. Although decline had set in on Athos
after it was plundered in the thirteenth century during
the Fourth Crusade, a revival occurred during the
following century . Maximos, part of the revival, along
with such stalwarts as Saint Gregory Palamas, upheld
the doctrine of hesy chasm. In fact, he carried
hesychasm to the extreme that became his trademark.
Maxmos availed himself of the vastness of the Athos
peninsula – a promontory s tretching thirty miles out
into the Aegean Sea, with a width in excess of six
miles . W hen he found it impossible to communicate
with God in the monasteries, even in any of the sketes
or caves, he fashioned a crude hut in whic h to
meditate and pray. W hen the hut seemed no longer
impervious to anything but purity, he would burn it and
build another. This habit caused him to be dubbed
Maximos Kafsokalyvitis (hut-burner). Living in his hut,
enveloped in prayer, Maximos thus experienced a
greater form of self-denial than simply the solitude and
austerity of an anchorite.
Just as Moses had gone up to Mount Sinai and Elijah
to Mount Carmel, Maximos ascended the holy
mountain of Athos – which rises abruptly out of the
Aegean for nearly seven thousand feet – an ascent
which few have dared to venture. Heedless of the
dangers and the biting cold, he scaled the lofty peak,
and in the stark seclusion that can be found only on a
mountain top, he prostrated himself before the Lord.
After a week passed, a vision of the Virgin Mary
appeared to him. The Theotokos told Maximos that he
would henceforth know spiritual perfection through the
Holy Spirit.
Maximos descended the sacred mountain with the
wisdom of ages stored within him, and with the sweet
serenity of the Holy Spirit in his heart. It was as though
he had been reborn, glowing with a presence that
suggested an intimacy with the Divine.
Word of his transformation brought scores seeking his
blessing and healing through the Holy Spirit. As a
result, he was so besieged that he sought the refuge of
his dismal hut.
Maximos withdrew to the seclusion of his hut and
would have lived out his day s there, but he was
prevailed upon to grace the community with his
presence. Instrumental in drawing him out of seclusion
was a noted hermit, Gregory of Sinai, who like many
others had gone to Mount Athos for the express
purpose of seeing the holy Maximos.
Mount Athos contains many miracle-working icons and
in the fourteenth century, Maximos was a living icon.
This gentle link with Divinity lived to be ninety-five
years old. Even after his death he continued to serve
those of the faithful seeking comfort at his grave site.
The fires of his huts have long since gone out, but the
flame of his holy spirit will never be extinguished.
The Church remembers St. Maximos Kafsokalyvitis on
January 12.
ST . THEODORA THE EMPRESS
February 11
Any one bearing the
name Theodora must
feel an inner pride in
having been so named. It
not only means the “gift
of God,” but is also the
namesake of one of the
most noble s ouls in all
Christianity . Theodora
w a s the w i fe o f
Theophilos emperor of
the Byzantine Empire
during the ninth century,
when the empire was at
its zenith.
Royalty has its advantages but the influence of a
monarch’s wife does not often hold sway, particularly
in a complex issue such as Iconoclasm which for 150
years had divided the Greek Orthodox Church. Much
as Theodora abhorred the idea of striping church
interiors of icons, it is to her everlas ting credit that
rather than let herself be swayed in her determination,
much as she chose to sway the emperor herself, she
lived in the hope that the icons would one day be
restored and that the issue would be settled in her
lifetime although it had stormed for three lifetimes. If
for nothing else this profoundly religious woman and
empress could have been sainted for her unyielding
stand on the issue when she could have chosen a
course of resignation or indifference. Claims and
counterclaims, lay and cleric, swirled about her and
she had but to join sides with the iconoclasts and that
in itself might very well have settled the question once
and for all afer a c entury and a half of dissension. It
could have well be that it was Theodora’s courageous
stand that made a difference. Hers was not a voice in
the wilderness. It emanated and echoed from the
palace. The echo of her voice of protest never died
and our churches are what they are today because she
refused to be stilled. She was not a nun. She was an
emperor’s wife, but a handmaiden of God by her own
choice.
During this period Iconoclasm was a s strong, s wiftmoving force which swept the empire. The supporters
of the iconoclastic movement believed that icons
should be purged from the churches. They thought that
veneration of icons was tantamount to idolatry. In fact,
many Orthodox Chris tians had come to believe that
icons, rather than being symbolic, were to be
worshiped for themselves. As a reaction against this
false understanding of the place of icons in Orthodox
worship, many favored the c omplete elimination of
icons. Believing that they were fighting against idolatry,
some emperors issued decrees banishing icons from
the churches and persecuting anyone possessing
icons.
Theophilos was such an iconoclast emperor, but due
solely to the efforts of his most noble wife, Theodora,
he was the las t. After 150 years, Iconoclasm was
finally defeated.
During the reign of her iconoclast husband, Theodora
secretly possessed many icons. She would kneel in
prayer and meditation before her icons, firm in the
belief that the time was at hand when the icons would
once again resume their rightful place in the house of
God.
Shortly after the death of Emperor Theophilos, one of
the first official acts of Empress Theodora as regent for
her son Michael III was to reinstate the icons. To do
this she convoked a General Synod in A.D. 843. This
Synod formally accepted the use of icons in Orthodox
worship, affirming that the veneration is paid to Christ
and the saints depic ted on the icons, and not to the
material substance of the paint and wood. This historic
decision is celebrated each year in the Orthodox
Church on the first Sunday of Lent, known a the
Sunday of Orthodoxy.
Thus, Empress Theodora gave all her support to the
recognition of icons as an essential element of
Orthodox worship, and in so doing proved to be an
instrument of God’s glory.
In her lifetime Empress Theodora revealed her true
nature to be more religious than civic, and because of
her faith and devotion to Christ, the Church became as
mighty as the empire. With her precious icons before
her, she died on 11 February 859, a true champion of
the Orthodox faith.
2015 STEWARDSHIP COMMITMENT – HONOR ROLL
T HE 90 STEWARDS LISTED BELOW PLEDGED
AS OF DECEMBER 5, 2014
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Please complete and return a 2015 Pledge card.
Anastasios Anastahas
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Arthur and Pauline Anton
Darrin Anton
Dolores Bachandouris
Debbie Bahlatzis
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Jordan Moisides
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Rev. Dennis and Mrs. Candice Nagi
Dhimo Nasi
Michael and Maria Neal
Kathleen Nucci
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Peter and Maria Pappas
Maria Patelos
Eleanore Peters
Harry Posporelis and Family
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Dr. Anthony Rodolakis & Laura Rodolakis
Terrell and Anne Roe
Andrew and Bessie Sandalakis
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Helen Sokaris
Jerry G. Sokaris and family
Lucy Sokaris
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Peter Sokaris
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C.J. and Cassandra Strippoli
Marie Takes
Helen Thomas
Helen and Marco Tomaso
Michos Tzovaras
Christine Vamvalis-Haley and John T. Haley
Constantine and Katherine Yavis
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2014 STEWARDSHIP COMMITMENT – HONOR ROLL
T HE 387 STEWARDS LISTED BELOW PLEDGED
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Jason and Gemma Allen
David and Eugenia Alven
Bertha Amanat
George Amanatides
Paul Amanatides
Vasilis Anagnostopolous
Danny and Panagiota Anagnost
Anastassios Anastahas
Benjamin and Isabella Anastasio
Constantine Anastasio
Joseph and Helen Anastasio
Marcella Anastasio
Urania Andrews
Tommy and Helene Annas
Arthur and Pauline Anton
Darrin Anton
Michael Anton
Paul Apostol and Family
Georgios and Nancy Athanassiadis
Konstantin and Cenka Averakis
Nektarios and Nikolitsa Avromidis
Dolores Bachandouris
Danny and Gail Bahlatzis
Debbie Bahlatzis
Eve Bahlatzis
Peter and Kathy Baltis
Stelios and Evelyn Baltis
Stephanie Baltis
Theodore and Glykeria Baltis
William and Caryl Baltis
Katina and Anthony Barulli
Thalia Bayer
Dean Beckos
Georgia Beckos-Wood & Constantine Beckos
Barbara Beckos, Theo and Arthur McDonald
Marie and Nicholas Beiniks
Senait Berhane and Family
Bob Bladel and Niki Ziamandanis Bladel
Maria and Richard Blinkhorn
Peter Bouloukos and Family
Angelo and Andrea Bousbouras
Emile and Angeliki Bousbouras
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Elizabeth and David Brown
Argie Cakouros
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Anesti and Flvira Cekani
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Alexandra and Robert Davis
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Borislav Dinkov
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Charles Economos
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Catherine and Lance Eldred
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Constantine Ermides
Harry and Diane Ermides
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Robert and Helen Fallon
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Greg and Nina Floyd
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Fotini Fotiu
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Nancy Gardner
Richard Garrow and Anastasia Vasilakos-Garrow
Katherine Genos
Andrew George
Anthony and Amy George
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Alexander and Sylvia Georgeadis
Maria Gezerlis
Christine and Arthur Gianakos
James and Mary Googas
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CELEBRATION
ON
OCTOBER 28, 2014
ON THE
USS SLATER
OXI DAY: THE DAY OF NO!
Father Dennis Nagi
entered Greece through the steep Pindos
Mountains. This was rough wild terrain made
worse by the onset of winter. As Italian troops
moved south they were met by the Greek army
which put up a very s tubborn resistance. The
rough roads and deep snow made it very difficult
for supplies to reac h the Italians. Meanwhile the
women of the local Greek villages carried supplies
and munitions on their backs to the Greek troops.
A Greek soldier, Argiris Balatsos, recorded his
encounter with several of these women in his
diary: 7 November, 1940, “I met women who were
carrying ammunition. One was 88 years old.
Another one told me she had locked her small son
in a shed, s o that she could come and help the
army. “During the night, I saw an old woman
taking care of two kids, while the mother was
baking bread for the army under candlelight.”
Once Adolph Hitler became chancellor of Germany in
1933, he proved successful in gaining much territory for
the Third Reich by not firing a shot. These areas
included the Rhineland, Austria, the Saar Basin, the
Sudetenland and then all of Czechoslovakia. During
those years, Benito Mussolini, the ruler of Italy and ally
of Germany, wanted to expand his territory as well. On
April 7, 1939 the Italian Army invaded Albania (whic h
happened to be Holy Friday for the Orthodox Christians
of Albania). Within a short time the Italian forces seized
control of the country. Encouraged by his success,
Mussolini decided to advance his military expansion by
invading Greece from Albania and hoped for another
rapid success.
At 3:00 am on the morning of October 28, 1940, the
Italian Ambassador to Greece, delivered an ultimatum
from Benito Mussolini to the Greek Prime Minis ter
Ioannis Metaxas. Il Duce demanded that Metaxas allow
the Italian Army free passage to enter and occupy
strategic sites in Greece unopposed by Greek forces.
Faced with this demand, Metaxas delivered an
unequivocal response in French (the diplomatic
language of the day). Metaxas’ response was “Then it is
war,” was quickly transmuted into the laconic OXI, the
Greek Word for No, by the citizens of Athens.
Mussolini’s advisors had assured Mussolini that the
invasion and seizure of Greece would take no more than
2 weeks. Like Albania, Greece was a small country with
a correspondingly small army.
The difference however lay in the territory. Italian forces
When spring c ame the following year the Greek
army , revived and strengthened, began pushing the
Italians back toward the boarder of Albania. W ithin 3
weeks, Greece was completely free of the invading
forces and began a counter attack driving deep into
Italian-held Albania.
Mussolini was humiliated and enraged. Hitler was also
furious at what he viewed as Mussolini’s blunder and the
embarrassment it was causing the Axis forces.
In March of 1941 Mussolini personally supervised a
ferocious counter-attack designed to drive the Greek
from Southern Albania. Despite his leadership, the
attacked failed, further humiliating the Italian Leader as
well as Hitler.
In response, Hitler reluctantly made the decision to
assist the Italians in their unsuccessful war against the
Greeks. I say reluctantly, because Hitler had planned to
use the troops he diverted to aid the Italian Army in his
invasion of Russ ia codenamed Operation Barbarossa.
His plan was to launch Operation Barbarossa in early
June of 1941. The Germans poured into Albania and
pushed the Greek Army back across the Albanian-Greek
boarder and swiftly overcame the Greeks and seized the
entire country and imposed a very harsh rule of the
Greeks for their stubborn resistance and forcing Hitler to
postpone his invasion of Russia for several months. The
Russians were unprepared for this German invasion
(Especially since Rus s ia and Germany had already
signed a non-aggression pact several years earlier.) The
Germans reached the outskirts of Moscow in the middle
of October with the positive outlook that Moscow would
fall within the next few days. Unfortunately, for the
German troops, an early winter arrived with freezing
temperatures’ and heavy snow. They were forced to dig
in and wait until spring to move ahead. This delay of
Operation Barbarossa for several months, was as a
result of the Greek nation’s stubborn resistance. Hitler’s
Chief of Staff, Field Marshall Wilhelm Keitel admitted
during the Nuremburg Trials: “the unbelievably strong
resistance delayed by 2 months the German attack on
Russia: if we did not have this long delay, the outcome
of the war would have been different in the Eastern Front
and the war in general.” Winston Churchill paid homage
to the Greek resistance by claiming: “Until now we would
say the Greek fight like heroes…from now on will say
that heroes fight like Greeks.” For these reasons, the
Greek at home and abroad honor the past by celebrating
Oxi day.
We are gathered here today on the deck of the U.SS.
Slater to commemorate Oxi day but to also remember
that this ship after fighting gallantly in World War II was
turned over to the Greek Navy in 1951 as part of the
Mars hall Plan whose goal was to stop the growth of
Communism throughout the world and to rebuild war
torn Europe and Asia. The Greeks renamed this ship the
Aetos whic h is the Greek world for eagle. She served
proudly in the Greek Navy for 40 years s erving as a
training ship for the Greek Naval Academy. In the early
1990’s the Greek Navy decommissioned the ship and
she was earmarked for the scrape yard but luckily she
was saved by a group of American World War ll
destroyer es cort veterans and brought to the United
States and eventually arrived here in Albany where a
major restoration was undertaken by volunteers. She
has been meticulously restored to her former glory and
now serves as a museum ship here in Albany, New
York.
St. Sophia Greek Orthodox Church
440 Whitehall Road
Albany, New York 12208
Greek Orthodox Youth of America
Sponsoring
CHEESE FARE SUNDAY LUNCHEON
February 22, 2015 at 12:00 P.M.
Luncheon also Includes
Å Salad Å Beverage Å Dessert Å
Children 5 & Under: Free
Children Ages 6 to 17: $7.00
Adults: $12.00
Reservations by February 1, 2015
Contact Church Office at 489-4442
or Spiro Sokaris
`
When the last prayer is said over the flower-banked
grave, the dirt has been placed over the coffin, and the
mourners drag leaden feet back to the somber funeral
cars, we think that we shall never forget the loved ones
we have laid to rest. Unfortunately, human nature is a
strange thing and the world is a busy place. We return
to the hectic life we live--with its business and housework, trips and outings, functions and operations, and its
thousand of trivial details.
Στις 14 Φεβρουαρίου είναι το πρώτο από τά 3
συνεχοµένα ψυχοσάββατα αφιερωµένα στήν
Εκκλησία πρός προσευχή δια τους αγαπηµένους
µας πού έχουν φύγει από αυτήν την ζωήν. Εκ
παραδόσεως οι Χριστιανοί έρχονται φέρνοντας
πρόσφορον, κόληβα και έναν κατάλογον ονοµάτων
των αποθανόντων που πρόκεται να µνηµονευθούν.
Προς ευκολίαν, σας εσωκλειούµε ένα έτυµο για
να το χρησιµοποιήσετε να γράψετε τα ονόµατα των
π ροσφιλών σας αποθανόντων. Παρακαλώ
διαθέσετε λίγο καιρό να γ ράψετε όσο πιό καθαρά
µπορείται τα ονόµατα π ου θέλετε να
µνηµονευθούν. Λάβετε υπ’ όψιν σας ότι δέν
χρειάζεται να τα φέρετε τρεις φορές. Τα ονόµατα
που θα φέρετε φυλάγονται και διαβάζονται και στα
τρία ψυχοσάββατα – 14 Φεβρουαρίου, 21
Φεβρουαρίου και 28 Φεβρουαρίου ακουλουθείες
που θα λάβουν µέρος απο 9:30 ΠΜ.
Too often our thoughts are far from our blessed ones
who have departed from this world. Even less are our
prayers as time wanes. Once in a while even the best of
us feel a twinge of remorse that we might not have been
as good as we could have been to the dear ones we
mourn and miss. But there comes a special time during
the year when we can commemorate them and think of
them...SATURDAY of SOULS.
_____________________________
_____________________________
_____________________________
_____________________________
_____________________________
_____________________________
Είθε ο Κύριος ηµών Ιησούς Χριστός δώση
αναπαύση στις ψυχές τών προσφιλων µας
αποθάνοντων και όπως οδηγήση ηµας στήν
εκπλήρωσιν τών υποχρώσεων µας προς αυτόν.
_____________________________
_____________________________
_____________________________
ΥΠΕΡ ΤΩΝ ΨΥΧΩΝ
`
For three consecutive Saturdays beginning Saturday,
February 6, we will have the opportunity to c ommemorate the faithful departed in Christ. It is during this
time that we as relatives or friends bring koliva, bake
special cakes or prosforo, and submit the names of our
departed loved ones to be commemorated in the Church.
Please remember to mark the dates and times of the
Services: Saturdays, February 14th, 21st and 28th at 9:30
AM.
PLEASE PRAY FOR
THE SOULS OF
ΨΥΧΟΣΑΒΒΑΤΑ
_____________________________
SATURDAY OF SOULS
IN THE COMMUNITY
9/11 is still fresh in our minds and cannot be forgotten. Philoptochos is sponsoring a fund
raiser on January 17th for the construction of the St. Nicholas National Shrine at
Ground Zero. This is a small way that we can honor those lost on that infamous day.
We hope to see many of our parishioners and friends attend. In the meantime during
the coffee fellowship on Sundays we will be playing a video of what St. Nicholas will
look like.
ELECTIONS | PARISH COUNCIL
The elec tions for the Parish Council took place on December 7th with 138
voters casting their votes. Below are the results by the Election Committee of
the six candidates . We congratulate the six candidates below receiving the
majority vote who will be on the Parish Council for a two-year term (20152016); the results of the elections are as follows:
Gregory Docous. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116
Stefan Kalogridis.. . . . . . . . . . . . . 114
Constantine Karlaftis. . . . . . . . . . . 113
Steven Moutopoulos. . . . . . . . . . . 102
Demetra Xythalis Vann. . . . . . . . . . 97
Theodore Moisides. . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
...Theodore Kondoprias, Election Committee Chair
BAPTISMS
Antonis Nikolas, son of Gregg and Maria Pidgeon, September 28
Anthony Mitsios, Godfather
Grace Olivia, daughter of Andrea Wedler, November 1
Alexis Golkin, Godmother
MARRIAGE
DEATH
WELCOME
NEW MEMBERS
Kevin Holmes with Stephanie Baltis, December 6
Theodore Baltis, Koumbaros
`
Jerry Spellos, age 78, October 21
Thomas Cossack, age 87, November 15
May their memory be eternal!
Let us cordially welcome the following new members to the St. Sophia
community. Please do not hesitate to greet our new members and offer any
assistance and/or information regarding the community and its organizations.
Effie Maglaras and Josh McBride
Rena Rigos
Georgia Kokolis and Romano Orzari
CHOIR
C H R IS TM A S
DONATIONS
We take this opportunity to thank our esteemed choir under the direction of
Harry Ermides for giving us a Christmas spirit with the carols they sang for our
enjoyment. Your wonderful performance brought joy to all of us. Thank you –
you are not taken “for granted” – we appreciate the commitment you all make
every week in order for the parishioners to appreciate y our s ervices. Of
course, new members are always welcome to join!
E N V E L O P E We are still receiving Christmas Envelope donations. We will wait until the next
issue of The Testament to thank all those who donated.
EASTER DONATIONS
The following items are needed for Great Lent and Holy Week 2015.
Individuals wishing to donate any of these items should call the Church Office.
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BIBLE STUDY
BAG LUNCHES
HOMELESS
THANK YOU
One floral wreath, 4 in total, for each Salutation service
One floral wreath for Akathist Service
Daffodils For Sunday of the Cross
Wreath for Service of Bridegroom on Palm Sunday evening
Rosewater
3 White Hand Towels
Linen Sheet
Palms for Palm Sunday morning
Wreath for Holy Wednesday Icon of the Last Supper
Holy Oil, Cotton Balls, and Q-Tips
Wreath for the Crucifixion on Holy Thursday evening
Rose Petals for Good Friday afternoon
200 Carnations for Good Friday afternoon
Monetary donations for Epitaphio flowers
Resurrection Banner (Lavaro)
Resurrection Icon Wreath
Resurrection Candle (Lambada)
Monetary donations for Easter lily plants
2-1/2 cases of eggs
Easter Candy
Father Pat has been conducting a bible study for several years. It has been a
small group who attend, but who are eager every month, to learn and better
understand the bible. If y ou are interested in learning, or better yet, to
understand the written word of the bible come and join us every third Tuesday
of the month.
FOR
THE A generous local donor has come forward of a van for delivery of lunches to
the homeless. Due to this development, the Philoptochos is now able to
resume once a month the “50 Bag Lunches” for the Homeless. However, their
fund for this endeavor is depleted, so they are now looking for donors of a $75
donation which makes the 50 lunches a month for local homeless people
possible.
Words cannot adequately express my sincere appreciation of the recognition
bestowed on me by my handsome grandson and president of the Sons of
Pericles, Michael Ziamandanis, and the entire Sons of Peric les group. I am
humbled to know that the group felt that I was worthy of such an honor. A
special thank you to Jimmy Googas, Supreme President of the Sons of
Pericles, Diane Tseckares, National Philoptochos Board Member, Effie
Galiatsatos, District Governor #6 of the Daughters of Penelope, Andrew
Zachariades, AHEPA Supreme Secretary and my grands on John
Ziamandanis. Your kind words will always hold a special place in my heart and
will never be forgotten. Last, but not least, thank you to my family for their
support throughout the years and for not making me feel guilty when I took
time away from them. I also want to extend my gratitude to each and everyone
of you who took time out of their busy schedule to attend the breakfast. Thank
you and wishing you all a Happy and Healthy Holiday Season.
...Theodora Mok hiber
On behalf of the Greek School Students, Parents and Teachers, I want to
extend a heart-felt thank you to the AHEPA organization for their commitment
to making the OXI DAY event so successful and for their hard work. I would
like to thank the president of AHEPA, Mr. Nick Panayotou, the supervisor for
the OXI DAY event, Mr. Michael Sokaris, and all the AHEPANS who helped
to make this event possible. Thank you very much for sponsoring it.
...Director/Teacher Kik i Maglaras
STEWARDSHIP PAYMENT INFORMATION:
Stewards are able to pay for their pledges in three ways.
‚
They may use the envelopes for their check and cash donations which are collected during the Sunday
services. If you failed to indicate the number of envelopes you wanted, leave a note with your name and
number of envelopes requested in the Financial Secretary's Office mailbox. These will be provided to
you.
‚
Stewards may also come to the Church Office and use a credit card to make pledge payments. This
has been an accepted practice and some parishioners did not know it was available.
...Financial Secretary
Please complete the 2015 Stewardship Commitment Card
and return to the Church Office attention: Stewardship
E
ACCOUNT NO. _________
IF YOU NEED ENVELOPES, HOW MANY __________
SAINT SOPHIA GREEK ORTHODOX CHURCH 2015 CONFIDENTIAL STEWARDSHIP COMMITMENT CARD
440 W HITEHALL ROAD, ALBANY, NEW YORK 12208 | TELEPHONE (518) 489-4442 | FAX (518) 489-0374
Name____________________________ Signature _____________________________ Dated _____________
Address____________________________________ City____________________________ St ___ Zip ______
Winter Address _________________________ Winter City___________________________ St ___ Zip ______
Applicable Winter Dates:
Begin Date: ___________
End Date: ________________
In gratitude for God’s blessings, I/we make the following commitment to St. Sophia Greek Orthodox Church. Enter
the specific dollar amount of your pledge.
Level 1.. . $100 to $200 $_______ Level 4. . . $1,001 to $1,500 $_______ Level 7. . . $3,501 to $4,500 $______
Level 2.. . $201 to $500 $_______ Level 5. . . $1,501 to $2,500 $_______ Level 8. . . $4,501 to $5,000 $______
Level 3.. . $501 to $1,000 $_______ Level 6. . . $2,501 to $3,500 $_______ Level 9. . . $5,001 or Greater $______
[If you are a new member a “Family Profile” form must also be completed.]
IN T HE COMING M ONTHS
DATE
EVENT
CONTACT
March 22
Greek Independence Day Program
Kiki Maglaras
th
March 15
4 Annual Greek Cooking Class
Sponsored by Philoptochos
TBA
March 28
Bus Trip to Astoria
Sponsored by Philoptochos
Maria Patelos
April 4
Sunday School Breakfast
and Preparation of Palms
Father Dennis
Dora Mokhiber
April 5
Palm Sunday Luncheon
Father Pat
April 12
Πάσχα
Father Pat
May 15-17
Greek Festival
Parish Council
May 23-25
Archdiocesan District Junior Olympics
Father Pat
May 31
Sunday School Graduation
Father Dennis
Maria Sokaris
May 31
Church Picnic
Parish Council
June 1
Church Name Day Brunch
Sponsored by Philoptochos
Theodora Mokhiber
June 7
Greek School Graduation
Kiki Maglaras
Ι Α Ν Ο Υ Α Ρ Ι Ο Σ – 2015
04
Κυριακή
8:30 ΠΜ
9:30 ΠΜ
‘Ορθρος – ΚΥΡΙΑΚΗ ΠΡΙΝ ΘΕΟΦΑΝΕΙΑ
Θεία Λειτουργία
Αποστ. Β’ Τιµ. 4:5-8 | Ευαγγ. Μαρκ 1:1-8
Τελετή Βασιλόπιττας
05
∆ευτέρα
9:30 ΠΜ
Θεία Λειτουργία – ΜΕΓΑΛΕΣ ΏΡΕΣ – Μικρός Αγιασµός
06
Τρίτη
9:30 ΠΜ
Θεία Λειτουργία – ΤΑ ΑΓΙΑ ΘΕΟΦΑΝΕΙΑ
Μέγας Αγιασµός των Υδάτων
07
Τέταρτη
9:30 ΠΜ
Θεία Λειτουργία – ΠΡΟ∆ΡΟΜΟΥ ΙΩΑΝΝΟΥ
11
Κυριακή
8:30 ΠΜ
9:30 ΠΜ
‘Ορθρος – ΚΥΡΙΑΚΗ ΜΕΤΑ ΘΕΟΦΑΝΕΙΑ
Θεία Λειτουργία
Αποστ. Εφ. 4:7-13 | Ευαγγ. Ματθ. 4:12-17
17
Σάββατον
9:30 ΠΜ
5:00 ΜΜ
Θεία Λειτουργία – Αντώνιος ο Μέγας
Αγ. Νικολάου Fund Raiser
18
Κυριακή
8:30 ΠΜ
9:30 ΠΜ
‘Ορθρος – ΙΒ’ Κυριακή Λούκα
Θεία Λειτουργία – Αθανάσιος και Κύριλλος
Αποστ. Εβ. 13:7-16 | Ευαγγ. Λούκα 17:12-19
20
Τρίτη
7:00 ΜΜ
Σπουδή Αγία Γραφή
25
Κυριακή
8:30 ΠΜ
9:30 ΠΜ
‘Ορθρος – ΙΕ’ ΚΥΡΙΑΚΗ ΛΟΥΚΑ
Θεία Λειτουργία
Αποστ. Εβ. 7:26-28, 8:1-2 | Ευαγγ. Λούκσ 19:1-10
30
Παρασκευή
9:30 ΠΜ
Θεία Λειτουργια – ΟΙ ΤΡΕΙΣ ΙΕΡΑΡΧΕΣ
Φ Ε Β Ρ Ο Υ Α Ρ Ι Ο Σ - 2015
1 Φεβρουαρίου άρχεται το Τριώδιον
01
Κυριακή
8:30 ΠΜ
9:30 ΠΜ
‘Ορθρος – ΚΥΡΙΑΚΗ ΤΕΛΩΝΟΥ ΦΑΡΙΣΑΙΟΥ
Θεία Λειτουργία
Αποστ. Ρωµ. 8:28-39 | Ευαγγ. Λούκα 18:10-14
02
∆ευτέρα
9:30 ΠΜ
Θεία Λειτουργία – Η ΥΠΑΠΑΝΤΗ ΤΟΥ ΚΥΡΙΟΥ
08
Κυριακή
8:30 ΠΜ
9:30 ΠΜ
‘Ορθρος – ΚΥΡΙΑΚΗ ΤΟΥ ΑΣΩΤΟΥ
Θεία Λειτουργία
Αποστ. Α’ Κορ. 6:12-20 | Ευαγγ. Λούκα 15:11-32
10
Τρίτη
9:30 ΠΜ
Θεία Λειτουργία – ΧΑΡΑΛΑΜΠΟΣ ΙΕΡΟΜΑΡΤΥΣ
14
Σάββατον
9:30 ΠΜ
Α’ Ψυχοσάββατον
15
Κυριακή
8:30 ΠΜ
9:30 ΠΜ
‘Ορθρος – ΚΥΡΙΑΚΗ ΤΗΣ ΑΠΟΚΡΕΩΣ
Θεία Λειτουργία
Αποστ. Α’ Κορ. 8:8-13, 9:1-2 | Ευαγγ. Ματθ. 25:31-46
17
Τρίτη
7:00 ΜΜ
Σπουδή Αγία Γραφή
21
Σάββατον
9:30 ΠΜ
Β’ Ψυχοσάββατον
22
Κυριακή
8:30 ΠΜ
9:30 ΠΜ
‘Ορθρος – ΚΥΡΙΑΚΗ ΤΗΣ ΤΥΡΙ ΝΗΣ
Θεία Λειτουργία
Αποστ. Ρωµ. 13:11-14, 14:1-4 | Ευαγγ. Ματθ. 6:14-21
Γεύµα Τυρί νης
12:00 ΜΜ
23 Φεβρουαρίου άρχεται Μεγάλη Τεσσαρακοστή
25
Τετάρη
9:30 ΠΜ
5:00 ΜΜ
Προηγιασµένη Λειτουργία
Μέγα Απόδειπνον
27
Παρασκευή
7:00 ΜΜ
Α’ Χαιρετισµοί
28
Σάββτον
9:30 ΠΜ
12:00 ΜΜ
Γ’ Ψυχοσάββσατον
Γεύµα Σαρακοστιανός
SAINT SOPHIA GREEK ORTHODOX CHURCH
440 WHITEHALL ROAD
ALBANY, NY 12208
Non-Profit Org.
U.S. Postage
PAID
Albany, NY
Permit No. 15
ADDRESS SERVICE REQUESTED
St. Sophia Mis s ion Statement – St. Sophia Greek Orthodox Church, Inc. is a not-for-profit religious community under the
leaders hip of the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of America, through the auspices of the Ecumenical Patriarchate in
Constantinople whose mission is to: (1) maintain, practice, and proclaim the Christian Orthodox faith, enhancing the spiritual
growth of its communicants; (2) develop and operate programs, activities, and services for the Parishioners which serve and
further the religious educational, cultural, philanthropic, and social ministries of the community as well as to protect and
continuously develop the physical buildings and religious property as deemed necessary; (3) dedicate the promotion of
Christian fellowship and values between the evolving diversity of cultures and its people